Einstein and Early X-Rays Feature In New Virtual Exhibition

16/01/2013
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Tvaika kuļmašīnas lokomobile, [192-], www.zudusilatvija.lv, Latvia
Tvaika kuļmašīnas lokomobile, [192-], www.zudusilatvija.lv, Latvia
Various types of steam-driven vehicles and flying machines, 1829, Wellcome Library
Various types of steam-driven vehicles and flying machines, 1829, Wellcome Library
Double cylinder press, c. 1890, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, Netherlands
Double cylinder press, c. 1890, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, Netherlands
Marie and Pierre Curie (centre) in their laboratory, Paris, 1900, Wellcome Library
Marie and Pierre Curie (centre) in their laboratory, Paris, 1900, Wellcome Library
Hispano Olivetti a gift that retains its value, 1930, National Library of Spain
Hispano Olivetti a gift that retains its value, 1930, National Library of Spain
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Handwritten correspondence with Albert Einstein and videos of 1930s operating theatres: these and hundreds of other notable scientific personalities and achievements from the 19th and 20th centuries are now on display in Science and Machines, a new featured collection from The European Library.

Early x-ray images taken by physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, portraits of pioneering researchers Marie and Pierre Curie and photographs of the 1913 Ghent World Fair can also be found among the more than 600 notable maps, letters, journals, videos and photographs selected for the showcase.

“This virtual exhibition brings to light many of the hopes and beliefs of former generations,” said Geert Vanpaemel, a physicist and science historian at Belgium’s University of Leuven.

“Steam engines and railroads, electric lights and airplanes, the telegraph, typewriter, motion pictures and plastics were just some of the significant inventions during this unique moment in history, when man seemed able to control his own world and to improve his living conditions beyond limits.”

The material was assembled by 21 national, university and research libraries from 17 European countries. It ties together themes such as new methods in medicine, the knowledge extension in the fields of natural history and the acknowledgement of this by the newly created Noble prize in 1895.

Each object is accompanied by curatorial information in English and the main language of the contributing institution. Many objects can also be downloaded.

Visit the exhibition here: http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/virtual/science

 

About The European Library

The European Library is a website that allows researchers to freely search the resources of Europe’s leading national and research libraries. This includes all of the bibliographic records of Europe (the Union Catalogue), plus over 24 million pages of full-text content and 10 million digital objects. Registered users can also download data sets for further research and export records to popular reference management systems such as Mendeley and Zotero.

Libraries that have contributed to this virtual showcase include:

  • Vienna University Library
  • Ghent University Library
  • National Library of Czech Republic
  • National and University Library in Zagreb
  • Bavarian State Library
  • National Library of Latvia
  • Martynas Mazvydas National Library of Lithuania
  • National Library of Luxembourg
  • National Library of the Netherlands
  • Romanian Academy Library
  • Russian State Library
  • National Library Russia
  • University library "Svetozar Markovic", Belgrade
  • Complutense University Library Madrid
  • University Library in Bratislava
  • National Library of Sweden
  • National Library of Spain
  • Slovak National Library
  • Swiss National Library
  • Zentralbibliothek Zurich
  • Wellcome Library

Previous pan-European exhibition of The European Library featured:

 

For further information, please contact Aubéry Escande (00 31 [0] 70314 0824; Aubery.Escande@kb.nl) or Friedel Grant (00 31 [0] 70314 0689; Friedel.Grant@kb.nl)